Thursday, July 04, 2019

Anderson Cooper says he doesn't believe in inheritance -- could he use his to run for president?


Anderson Cooper, the meticulous and openly gay journalist who has a major evening show AC360 on CNN, and whose political views tend to be centrist and moderate (relative to the Democratic Party) has said that he doesn’t believe in inheritance, after learning he had inherited most of his late mom’s $200 million estate. 


Anderson can say he paid his dues as a journalist as a younger man by reporting from Southeast Asia.  Sebastian Junger can make similar claims with his own life.

In fact, Anderson’s knowledge of policy is so extensive that he could have been a logical candidate for president (joining Buttigieg?)   Could the fortune make him think about this? Should a journalist run for president? What if Sebastian were to run?

Market Watch, this morning, notes that most kids need their family inheritances to get through life, an unsustainable situation. 
  
Market Watch has another article showing how wealthier parents can help their kids earn inheritances.   Gloria Vanderbilt did it right with Anderson.
  
If you look at kids who do well (John Fish, Jack and Luke Andraka, Taylor Wilson-scientist) they all had parents who inspired them to be productive and think through their own goals, apart from tribes or the opinions of others – a bit of Ayn Rand individualism.  Fish has a video explaining that his father (in Canada) is a physics teacher, so that certainly gives him an edge.
      
I can remember, however, that some on the extreme Left want to expropriate and do away with inherited wealth.  I saw this with the People’s Party of New Jersey back in 1972.  It happened to Andy Ngo’s parents in Vietnam in the 1970s (as it went all communist in 1975). 

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